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Welcome

The Horticultural Sciences Department at the University of Florida is a team of faculty, staff, and students dedicated to improving fruit and vegetable production for the benefit of farmers and consumers. Florida’s climatic diversity and the facilities at UF provide opportunities for research with temperate, sub-tropical, and tropical crops on a nearly year-round basis. We conduct cutting-edge research in plant breeding & genetics, plant and environmental physiology, fruit & vegetable production, postharvest physiology, biochemistry, and other disciplines. We offer high-quality education and training for undergraduate and graduate students to equip them with the skills needed to be successful in satisfying, high-paying careers. Our diverse faculty is located throughout the state, integrating our research/teaching/extension programs to provide practical experience for our students, technical support for our farmers, relevance for our horticulture industry, and a pipeline to bring leading research from our labs to you.

Agriculture

A first: Scientists grow plants in soil from the Moon

Scientists at the University of Florida are the first to grow plants in soil from the Moon. They used soil collected during the Apollo 11, 12 and 17 missions. In their experiment, the researchers wanted to know if plants would grow in lunar soil and, if so, how the plants would respond to the unfamiliar environment, even down to the level of gene expression. This study is the first step toward one day using lunar soil to grow plants on Read More

Agriculture

Strawberry growers globally could benefit from UF/IFAS research into dangerous disease

Strawberry farmers worldwide may get help from new University of Florida research that shows a way to battle one of the fruit’s fiercest foes. The key: combine genomic data with phenomics. The genome amounts to all the DNA in an organism. Phenomics is the study of plant growth, performance and composition. Through phenomics, scientists use DNA to measure plant traits. In a newly published study, UF/IFAS scientists found a new way to helpRead More